Soggy Lee

Limehouse LockIt was a soggy day, hats and gloves came out for the first time and the continual shower of leaves really felt like autumn. Murk loved being rural and kept his head down without the slightest look to get back onboard.Lee Navigation The locks are slow to fill and heavy on the gates but the paddles wind easily enough. Just a couple of boats about plus one canoeist who bravely shared a lock with us – he seemed oblivious to the crushing potential, whilst we hung onto the ropes, acutely aware of the slightest 20 tonne tug in his direction. Crazy guy.Lee Navigation

By early afternoon the rain had set in so we pulled over to the bank opposite the rowing club in Broxbourne and moored alongside a handful of other boats with smoking chimneys. Depsite a fair bit of washing, cooking and drying waterproofs, nasty condensation hasn’t taken hold yet.

By far the most exciting photo of the day was taken by a lovely guy we met on our ascent from the Thames, a great reminder of an exciting day – thank you Paul!

 


Pearlies

Lee Navigation near LimehouseLeaving Limehouse Basin we turned right and out onto the Lee Navigation. Soon into the Lee Navigation near Limehouseland of the Pearly Kings and Queens, through Bow Locks and nearishly past the Bow Bells. The ‘to be true Cockney’ rule that you have to be born within earshot of Bow Bells means it was technically impossible toLee Navigation be a Cockney throughout certain times in history: in 1666, St Mary-le-bow was destroyed by the great fire;  in 1941 the bells were Lee Navigationdestroyed by blitz bombing and today causes a bit of a problem as the surrounding area is no longer residential although a few hospitals within ear shot of the bells do their bit to keep the Cockneys coming.

The Olympic Stadium reentrance to Olympic Stadiummains barricaded off to casual passers-by although a strict in/out trip tOlympic Stadiumhrough the park is do-able by prior arrangement. Judging by the stacks of boats bobbing about nearby, the heavily guarded loop of water would fill up in no time if the barricades came down.

Hackney was busy with lively, colourful conversions – galleries, cafes, bars, theatres, studios all packed with Sunday morning crowds. Life drained Hackneyaway as we headed out towards Tottenham, where the water feels side-lined compared to what went before. The banks continue to be chock full of boats and it’s pretty safe to consider any space is probably there due to shallow water rather than being up for grabs in terms of mooring. We ploughed on…

…and on.

Interesting stuff dwindled tTottenhamo the point of nothing other than long, straight stretches, flanked by pylons – swerving the islands of Lee Navigationweeds grappling for the prop was something to get excited about. Never one to give up, Nick kept flicking the Nicholson pages, convinced there was better to come, and there was, just above Rammey Marsh Lock, before the M25. A pretty stretch with trees and grass and STICKS which meant kindling and an easy fire.


Down To The River

Cafe Laville, Little VeniceTime was up in Little Venice so we detangled our ropes from our neighbour’s, shuffled boats about, then stopped at the tap for gallons and gallons of water. The washing machineRegent's Canal was going flat-out for most of the day. Under Cafe Laville where Nick sent a few lattes, flat whites and green teas flying by testing the horn. Amazing how small London canal world soon squashes – turning down into Camden we passed our neighbour midway through a trip boat commentary. A top lock hanger Islington joined us – as did a volunteer, which was a bonus. Camden

Camden was crazy busy, the lock gates double as benches, with some long-term sitters no longer recognising them as integral to the working of the lock. It took a while, but we emerged the otherside and began the run along Regent's Canalto Kings Cross. The Islington moorings are few in number and strictly single moor but they’re very nice and have a waterpoint close by.

Bethnal Green wound round, and back, and in on itself, Victoria Park was packed with all sorts of boats and boaters – just about anything can pop out of a hatch along tMile Endhere. The light had begun to fade as we dropped through the final lock and Limehouse Marinainto Limehouse – deserted compared to the last time we were here, we pitched up, the only boat hugging the concrete wall last night.

When the rain finally cleared and the sun broke through we walked down through Canary Wharf and Thames at Isle of Dogsbeautiful West India Docks before ending up in Millwall – aside from a walk along the Thames the main purpose of the trip was to buy fire lighters…it’s not easy in London. Don’t Londoners have fires?

Back at Limehouse we moved over to the super sucky pump-out machine that managed to get right down to our green light. Yay. Fire lit, shit pumped and chicken in – even city life can stay relatively simple.


Cocktail

Trafalgar SquareForget asking to share mooring rings, guarding your offside from moor alongsiders and expecting any sort of gap between your boat and the next, London is a whole different ball game – one continual loop of musical boats where everyone ropes up to anythinJared Odrickg that keeps them roughly secured to the towpath, it’s not that people aren’t nice, everyone gets along well enough, it’s just the way it is.

So, wRegent's Streetriting from a different patch of water from the one we’d expected to sleep on, we took advantage of this NFL Regent's Streetevening’s boat shuffle and hooked up to the nearest waterpoint before settling in for the NFL Regent's Streetnight – possibly.

A far cry from someSpeakers' Corner of the dark, deserted rural spots we’ve parked up in, here the sky isn’t ever truly black and the towpath never sleeps.

A couple of days discovering and re-discovering Portrait GalleryLondon we’ve come across all Speakers' Cornersorts: NFL on Regent’s Street (good, but the drains were oh so stinky), Covent Garden, a lively Speakers’ Corner (not one for you SFR), Kensington Gardens, Trafalgar Square, the National Portrait Gallery (loved that)…

Bill Nighy's back

Bill Nighy’s back

The house boats across tundergroundhe water and the enormous Georgian houses beyond make for a pretty good view, meanwhile they get to look a stack of us boaters; one big cocktail of people all getting something from the canal, somehow it seems to work.

 


Living Local

Despite far less boat travel tTower and poppieshan normal we seem to have been all over the place thisMillenium Bridge last week, thanks to legs and trains. Our mental web of London continues to gradually grow and some roads are magically beginning to link up, making a few convenient loops.

Unfortunate enoSouth Bankugh to take navigational advice from SFR, AJ and UM arrived at Paddington Little Venicehaving traipsed through most of London on foot – this wasn’t made any more enjoyable by a very large roll of rubber we’d asked them to bring along. It was lovely to catch up with the ‘la famille’ and with London dangling off tube stops it doesn’t take too long to get right back down to the Thames and onto the South Bank. The tower poppy display is spreading, apparently the appeal for volunteers to plant the ceramic flowers was overwhelming.Thames

‘Home’ in terms of family is now just a 30 minute Southern Rail ride away (when there hasn’t been a fatality on the line that is), which feels so local Grand Union towards Kensal Greencompared to Manchester or Birmingham. Swiss Family came up trumps with a great book to aid our London adventure and it was brilliant to see so many familiar faces in one place!

Having maxed out our stay in Paddington Basin we untied anKensal Green Sainbury'sd headed out for water in Little Venice followed by a mega shop at the mammoth Sainsbury’s at Kensal Green. Boats boats boats everywhere, every shape, every sort, pretty much anything goes. Little Venice is twinkling tonight, breasted up and not far along from our lovely neighbours Golden Hinde IIfrom Paddington Basin, so far so good – although the far end, beyond theLittle Venice designated visitor moorings has some pretty nasty bags of grot on the tow path and so much rubbish dumped in the water it’s actually impossible to moor.

It’s been a bit of a whirlwind last few days, but London life is beginning to shape up nicely.


Portobello Road

Portobello MarketBoris bikes definitely seem the way to go as at the moment we are walking our legs off. It was anotherPortobello Road sunny morning so we set off in the direction of Little Venice and ended up in Portobello Market. The market dates back to 1870 when traders gathered to sell their horses. Busy sPortobello Roadtreets, splashes of colourful houses, out of the ordinary things for sale and an energetic atmosphere made for an interesting wander. A long list of films, nNottinghillovels and songs have sprung from various doors and shops – not least Paddington Bear who enjoyed elevenses on Portobello Road with Mr Gruber each day – resulting in clusters of flashing cameras in various locations.

A few areas are beginning to join together now, meaning we Portobello Roadmight manage our way home without following the blue dot provided we’re within a 10 minute radius of PaNottinghillddington Basin.

Legs hanging, we opened the door to a fresh and fully fueled Murk, eager for a walk, so after a very quick lunch we were back out – off through Bayswater and down to Hyde Park.

The moorings have busied up as the weekend has gone on, tonight was especially busy with boats circling in search of a space.


Bright Lights

Limehouse BasinLimehouse Basin was a lovely place to stay, boats coming up and heading out into the wider water provided regular entertainment, one especially beautiful yacht moored opposite – complete with a muesli eating, wholesome yacht boy. Originally known as Regent’s Canal Dock, in 1865 1,500 ships and 15,336 barges entered, it was expanded several times and often so busy you could walk the water by hopping from one boat to another. Changing water levels were interesting as with high tide the deep lock we rose in shrivels to barely a lock at all. The Thames effectively provides one large lung for London with stale air being pulled out and fresh bought in on the tides.

Leaving the basinRegent's Canal we faced our first double locRegent's Canalk since the Huddersfield Broad. It was great to share with a couple we’d been moored next to, the ride up towards Camden has endless (mainly stationary) boaRegent's Canalts and people all around everywhere. Split from our lock buddies for a while we headed separate ways for wateKing Robbo - Banksyr – turning up at St Pancreas Cruising Club it was clear that Nicholson has slipped in a not totally public waterpoint; luckily the guy was very nice and let us hook up, despite the tap not being the ‘free for all’ variety for over 30 yeRegent's Canalars.

After passing the bridge where King Robbo and Banksy staged their well documented graffiti war, we arrived in Camden and worked through the two locks we first had a go at on a days training in 2012. It was a messy affair back then.CamdenBlack Bart crew!

Through Maida Hill tunnel and past Regents Zoo, we entered Little Venice before moving on to Paddington Basin. Incredibly lucky to find two moorings available we pitched up with the crew from Black Bart who own chairs – and we like them – that’s the second lot of chair owners weRegent's StreetPaddington Basin‘ve enjoyed spending time with now!

Loving London life so far, Hyde Park has Murk’s seal of approval and Oxford Street, Park Lane, Marylebone and Mayfair are all around a ten minute walk away.